Real life tetris by Michael Johansson

August 12, 2021

From Sunday 8 October 2018 Museum Voorlinden will be exhibiting the work of Swedish artist Michael Johansson, the Swedish artist whose colourful installations are often described as real life Tetris. Johansson collects old furniture, household items and other equipment from second hand shops and flea markets. He puzzles, stacks and organises this chaos of everyday objets carefully by colour and transforms them into geometric, abstract sculptures.

Museum Voorlinden, near Rotterdam, showcases a number of existing works, as well as a new wall-to-wall artwork that Johansson created specifically for this exhibition. Definitely worth a visit!

Real life tetris by Michael Johansson - iVisual
Real life tetris by Michael Johansson - iVisual
Real life tetris by Michael Johansson - iVisual
Real life tetris by Michael Johansson - iVisual

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