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What is colour?

What is colour?

Color does not exist, but is created in our brains. In order to see color we need light, an object and our eyes. Color arises in the presence of light. Whenever light falls on an object, some of the rays are reflected by the object and the remainder is absorbed. The part that is reflected, determines the color.

Measuring colour

Measuring colour

Color measurement devices are necessary for accurate color communication. Visual evaluation of color is subjective, affected by our memory and highly depends on the viewing conditions. Therefore, depending on the application, either spectrophotometers or colorimeters are used to accurately and objectively capture and communicate color. Even though both spectrophotometers and colorimeters are used to measure color, they work in very different ways and are used for different applications. Choosing the right color measurement device depends on your application and price range, which requires a good understanding of both technologies.

Monochromatic firestations by Pedevilla Architects

Monochromatic firestations by Pedevilla Architects

These monochromatic constructions were designed by Pedevilla Architects, known for the simplicity and intelligence in their designs, linking the interior of the fire stations with their exterior and surroundings.

Dangerous colours

Dangerous colours

Throughout history some colors have created destruction. Some intense pigments were used widely for decoration as the concern about them was still unknown. Back then, you had to be a daredevil to use color by times. Read on to know how color is not always that innocent.

The impact of colour

The impact of colour

Did you know that the color of our surroundings is the first thing that pops into our eye? Not the shape or material of an object, but its color is the first visual component registered by our brain. Unlike other mammals, humans are programmed to register color immediately. The origin of this process lies in our evolutionary needs. As nomads, we had to be able to make fire and distinguish the ripe from the rotten berries. Reading the landscape was a necessary skill for survival.

Breathing Colour by Hella Jongerius

Breathing Colour by Hella Jongerius

Our team visited the amazing exhibition by Dutch designer Hella Jongerius at the Design Museum in London. Jongerius does research on colors, textures and materials. According to Hella, all her questions are open-ended, and all her answers provisional, taking the form of finished and semi-finished products. Through this way of working, she does not only celebrate the value of the process, but also engages the user in her investigation. Her installation based exhibition takes a deeper look at the way colors behave, exploring shapes, materials, shadows and reflections.

iVisual workshop

iVisual workshop

In case you didn’t know, our color experts organize workshops to share their knowledge with other color enthusiasts. The Color Navigator System workshops are taught to professionals, companies, universities, etc. They are tailor-made for different industries such as fashion, design, product development, architecture, interior design and digital media. We also offer courses to develop general or specific color skills, such as understanding color, color psychology, color management and color reproduction.

Reproducing colour

Reproducing colour

There are billions of colors. From fuchsia pink to lemon yellow, from mint green to cobalt blue, from eggplant purple to ruby red and everything in between. A monitor can display 16 million of them, a printer or printing machine can print off thousands. When you consider that the human eye can on average distinguish 300 colors and a more practiced eye sees around 1000 colors, then the range of a printing machine is still quite large by comparison.

Real life tetris by Michael Johansson

Real life tetris by Michael Johansson

From Sunday 8 October 2018 Museum Voorlinden will be exhibiting the work of Swedish artist Michael Johansson, the Swedish artist whose colorful installations are often described as real life Tetris.Johansson collects old furniture, household items and other equipment from second hand shops and flea markets. He puzzles, stacks and organizes this chaos of everyday objets carefully by color and transforms them into geometric, abstract sculptures.

Colourful chocolates to beat Blue Monday

Colourful chocolates to beat Blue Monday

Blue Monday is claimed to be the most depressing day of the year. Don’t let this gloomy day get to you and enjoy the ultimate comfort food: these colorful modular chocolates called ‘Complements’. A delicious treat for both the eyes and the tastebuds.